Last edited by Tekree
Friday, July 10, 2020 | History

3 edition of Economic consequences of population change in industrialized countries found in the catalog.

Economic consequences of population change in industrialized countries

Conference on Population Economics (1983 University of Paderborn)

Economic consequences of population change in industrialized countries

proceeding of the Conference on Population Economics, held at the University of Paderborn, West Germany, June 1-June 3, 1983

by Conference on Population Economics (1983 University of Paderborn)

  • 199 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published by Springer-Verlag in Berlin, New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Developed countries
    • Subjects:
    • Population -- Economic aspects -- Developed countries -- Congresses.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementedited by Gunter Steinmann.
      SeriesStudies in contemporary economics ;, 8, Studies in contemporary economics ;, v. 8.
      ContributionsSteinmann, Gunter., Stiftung Volkswagenwerk.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHB849.41 .C66 1983
      The Physical Object
      Paginationx, 415 p. :
      Number of Pages415
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2843659M
      ISBN 100387135138
      LC Control Number84005633

        One example of the impact of population on economic growth can be seen in Detroit, where the local infrastructure suffered dramatically as people moved away. The city filed for bankruptcy in and used the freedom from debt to reinvest in the local economy. Population Aging and Its Economic Consequences for the People’s Republic of China 13 B. Population Aging and the Support Ratio The economic consequences of population aging can be assessed using general equilibrium analysis of overlapping generations models and in other rather complicated ways that require many assumptions,Author: Ronald Lee.

      in Industrialized Countries Kumiharu Shigehara A clear break in the post-World War I1 pattern of rapid productivity growth was a virtually universal phenomenon across Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries, in most of them beginning in the early s. This development had implica-. The consequences of population aging has emerged as an active research area as countries have entered the later stages of the demographic transition. In contrast to the long -standing interest in the economic consequences of demographic change, there has been a more recent explosion of interest in demographic behavior.

      "An extremely important book which contains a number of uniformly excellent papers on a variety of topics relating, to various degrees, to the nexus of demographic-economic interrelationships for presently developing countries."—William J. Serow, Southern Economic Journal "An important landmark in the growing field of economic demography."—Dudley Kirk, Journal of Developing .   As of December , people 65 or older account for more than 20% of the total population in only three countries: Germany, Italy and Japan. This figure is expected to rise to 13 countries by


Share this book
You might also like
Indian tribes of North America

Indian tribes of North America

Rent regulation, housing affordability problems, and market imperfections

Rent regulation, housing affordability problems, and market imperfections

social context of literacy

social context of literacy

Investment in Nigerian tree crops

Investment in Nigerian tree crops

Germany

Germany

Computer music no. 72 (Spring 2004)

Computer music no. 72 (Spring 2004)

Proceedings of the Second Joint Meeting on Applied Science and Technology

Proceedings of the Second Joint Meeting on Applied Science and Technology

parcel of Kent

parcel of Kent

The Complete Handbook of Baseball 1984

The Complete Handbook of Baseball 1984

When the old man died

When the old man died

Vatican City

Vatican City

Qurʼān

Qurʼān

Building law illustrated

Building law illustrated

Eonika Dintemata Uno H.S. Sunodinou

Eonika Dintemata Uno H.S. Sunodinou

Media: Communication and Production. GNVQ Intermediate Level Unit 10: Producing Advertisements..

Media: Communication and Production. GNVQ Intermediate Level Unit 10: Producing Advertisements..

Little Missouri

Little Missouri

Economic consequences of population change in industrialized countries by Conference on Population Economics (1983 University of Paderborn) Download PDF EPUB FB2

Economic Consequences of Population Change in Industrialized Countries Proceedings of the Conference on Population Economics Held at the University. : Economic Consequences of Population Change in Industrialized Countries: Proceedings, Paderborn, West Germany, June, (Studies in Contemporary Economics) (): Gunter Steinmann: Books.

Economic Consequences of Population Change in Industrialized Countries Proceedings of the Conference on Population Economics Held at the University of Paderborn, West Germany, June 1–3, Editors: Steinmann, Gunter (Ed.) Free Preview.

Economic Consequences of Population Change in Industrialized Countries: Proceedings of the Conference on (Studies in Contemporary Economics Vol 8) [Steinmann, Gunter] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Economic Consequences of Population Change in Industrialized Countries: Proceedings of the Conference on (Studies in Contemporary.

Get this from a library. Economic consequences of population change in industrialized countries: proceeding of the Conference on Population Economics, held at the University of Paderborn, West Germany, June 1-June 3, [Gunter Steinmann; Stiftung Volkswagenwerk.;].

Get this from a library. Economic consequences of population change in industrialized countries: proceedings of the Conference on Population Economics held at the Univ.

of Paderborn, West Germany, June 1 - June 3, [Gunter Steinmann; Conference on Population Economics (, Paderborn);]. Abstract. The past fifteen years have seen the emergence or the re-emergence (Serow, ) of concern with the economic consequences of the demographic and social changes implicit in what appear to be more or less permanent changes in the demographic behavior of citizens of industrialized by: 3.

With rapidly growing population, it becomes difficult to manage the adjustments that accompany economic and social change. Urbanisation in UDCs creates such problems as housing, power, water, transport, etc.

Besides, growing population threatens permanent environmental damage through urbanisation in some rural areas. Consequence # 4.

Per Capita. change on economic growth and examines the research evidence on the economic impact of changes in age structure. It also examines the relationship between population change and economic devel-opment in particular regions of the world, including East Asia, Latin America, sub-Saharan Africa, and the Middle East and North Size: KB.

mies of a large population. There are several reasons why population growth in developing countries is today a greater economic burden than it once was in today's developed countries: Population growth is now much more rapid. As Chapter 4 showed, in industrializing Europe it seldom exceeded percent a year, compared.

Economic Consequences of Population Change in Industrialized Countries: Proceedi Economic Consequences of $ Consequences Population of Economic Change Countries: Industrialized in Proce. A review of The Economic Consequences of the Peace by John Maynard Keynes.

The bad news: Most of the book is spectacularly boring to read, as Keynes deluges us with economic figures. I'm an aspiring economist, and even my eyes began to glaze over/5.

Economic pa rticipatio n drops sharpl y after the reti rement age of 65 in countries with high pensio n coverage, whic h means the impact of popula tion Author: Meltem Ince Yenilmez. More about this item Book Chapters The following chapters of this book are listed in IDEAS. Ansley J.

Coale, "Introduction to "Demographic and Economic Change in Developed Countries"," NBER Chapters, in: Demographic and Economic Change in Developed Countries, pagesNational Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Halvor Gille, "An International. Economic Consequences of population growth controlling population growth without much change in socio-economic conditions. is done more by the industrialized countries than the poor/non.

Paper presented at the International Conference on the Economic Consequences of Population Change in Industrialized Countries, University of Paderborn, Paderborn, West Germany, 31 May– 4 June Keyfitz, N.

and Flieger, W.World population: An analysis of vital data, Chicago: University of Chicago PressCited by: Bloom, D.E., Canning, D. and Sevilla, J. () The Demographic Dividend A New Perspective on the Economic Consequences of Population Change.

RAND Corporation, Santa. InFrank W. Notestein further developed this theory and suggested that there was a relationship between population change and industrialization. A debate continues questioning if population growth must decline for economic development or if economic progress (or industrialization) leads to slower population growth.

The category of newly industrialized country (NIC) is a socioeconomic classification applied to several countries around the world by political scientists and represent a subset of developing countries whose economic growth is much higher than other developing countries; and where the social consequences of industrialization, such as urbanization, are reorganizing.

Social change The transformation of culture (especially norms and values), behavior, social institutions, and social structure over time. refers to the transformation of culture, behavior, social institutions, and social structure over time. We are familiar from earlier chapters with the basic types of society: hunting and gathering, horticultural and pastoral, agricultural, industrial, and.

This upsurge in research activity motivated the organisation of an international conference entitled "Economic Consequences of Population Change in Industrialized Coun­ tries", which was held Author: George B.

Simmons.lived in countries with below-r eplacement fertility between andas compared to percent from to It is projected that more than half of the world population will live in countries with a fertility rate below the replacement level in Cited by: Internal Migration in Developing Countries itself or even in its effect on the sectoral allocation of human resources.

It is in the context of its implications for economic growth in general and for the "character" of that growth, particularly its distributional.